Vermont College Blames Halloween Parties for the Covid Outbreak

Vermont College Blames Halloween Parties for the Covid Outbreak

The Halloween celebrations were a major concern for the experts and Federal Government. It was expected that colleges hosting Halloween parties will surely fall into the trap of increasing delta variant covid 19 cases. 

Vermont College Blames Halloween Parties

Vermont college complained about the increasing cases because of the multiple Halloween parties hosted. Though Vermont has one of the highest vaccination rates in the country, with 79 percent of people receiving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, according to state data. 

Vermont College Blames Halloween Parties for the Covid Outbreak

The state, on the other hand, is experiencing more cases than ever before, with the Vermont Department of Health reporting 505 new cases on Friday. According to the president of Vermont’s Saint Michael’s College, a recent COVID-19 outbreak on campus that resulted in 89 new cases was linked to multiple Halloween parties.

Lorraine Sterritt wrote to the school community on Sunday, saying that administrators are “very sorry” that the study into the cause of the spike in positive cases “points to Halloween parties as a big component of the problem.” “I call on all members of our community to act appropriately in order to protect the entire community,” Sterritt concluded. 

We accept our failed efforts to follow the College’s regulations during a pandemic. The unvaccinated and unmasked students have created major ramifications on one’s own safety, the safety of other members of the community and their families, and the college’s ability to function effectively.”

The United States Of America is still in the midst of a pandemic that is killing over 1,000 people every day. Masking, in combination with other safety measures, effectively reduces COVID-19 transmission in K-12 schools, according to some intensive studies.

Masks are less expensive than remodeling school buildings to enhance ventilation or establish outdoor learning areas, and they’re (still) easier to obtain than COVID-19 testing, which can be used to prevent transmission as well.

If they have a long commute, they may be wearing masks for 10 or more hours every day; in some districts, masks are needed even outside the building. Social development, language learning, skin discomfort, and mental health are all concerns for parents.

In Vermont, the state health officials are continuously monitoring and urging nonvaccinated citizens to get the vaccination and keep themselves safe and intact. Also, more than 50% of the citizens of 65 years and above have even received their covid booster shots and 30 Percent of children of 5-11 years of age started receiving the vaccination. 

People who have never had COVID-19 and are unvaccinated are at greater risk. Even fully vaccinated people are at increased risk as time passes between illness and vaccination, resulting in diminishing immunity. If you choose to party, the best way to reduce your risk is for those who have already been infected to get vaccinated and those who have already been immunized to get their booster injection. 

Infectious disease expert Dr. Amesh A. Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, told that it’s possible to attend parties securely right now – everyone simply needs to be vaccinated.