Being alone can lead to many drastic changes in lifestyle like depression, stress, etc. Many people who stay alone have developmental conditions. This mainly affects in the 40s and 50s, as people in this age have much to say. A recent study proved that being with someone who listens can be very beneficial to your brain.

Researchers analyzed around 2,200 people living in America and who didn’t have anybody to talk to in their 40s and 50s. The researchers noticed that the people who didn’t have anyone to talk to had a mental (cognitive) age of 4-5 years older than the people who had someone to listen to them.

Having Someone’s Company To listen To You May Be Good For Your Brain

Those who live a lonely life may have an inverse effect of this lifestyle on their brain also. Their typical lifestyle may lead to a deteriorating state of cognitive skills which may be experienced over a period in one’s behavior and actions.

Having Someone’s Company To listen To You May Be Good For Your Brain

If you live in a company of an individual you may have an active lifestyle that can affect cognitive skills and learn in a positive manner said an expert.

Cognitive resilience is a measure of the brain’s ability to work efficiently than expected according to the age of the person. The researchers linked cognitive resilience to the people who didn’t have people to listen to. It can tell if the person is at risk of serious diseases caused by the loneness.

Neurologists believe that cognitive resilience can be improved through various activities like physical exercises, social interactions, different brain-stimulating activities, etc.

“We think of cognitive resilience as a buffer to the effects of brain aging and disease,” said lead researcher Dr. Joel Salinas. Dr. Joel Salinas is a member of the Center for Cognitive Neurology (CCN) at the New York University Grossman School of Medicine in New York City.

“This study adds to growing evidence that people can take steps, either for themselves or the people they care about most, to increase the odds they’ll slow down cognitive aging or prevent the development of symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease — something that is all the more important given that we still don’t have a cure for the disease,” Salinas added.

The study’s findings were released on Aug 16in JAMA Network Open.

Salinas also added that the four years difference in cognitive age between the people who had someone to listen to and the people who didn’t have anybody to listen to.

“Too often, we think about how to protect our brain health when we’re much older, after we’ve already lost a lot of time decades before to build and sustain brain-healthy habits,” Salinas added.

Salinas also said that you can ask yourself if you truly have someone available to listen to you in a supportive way, and ask your loved ones the same. Taking that simple action sets the process in motion for you to ultimately have better odds of long-term brain health and the best quality of life you can have.

Salinas also suggested that doctors should ask the patients about their social condition and if they have somebody to talk to.

Loneliness is one of the many symptoms of depression and has other health implications for patients. A person’s social relationships and feelings of loneliness can tell you a lot about a patient’s broader social circumstances, their future health, and how they’re really doing outside of the clinic.

The study suggested that adults especially in their 40s and 50s should have more social interactions and improve cognitive resilience through activities like physical exercises, social interactions, different brain-stimulating activities, etc.