Scientists Are Looking Into COVID Affected Children’s Immune Systems

Scientists Are Looking Into COVID Affected Children's Immune Systems

A sad new low has been reached by several hospitals eighteen months after the outbreak of Covid-19 began, with the Delta variety driving a huge recurrence of the illness in many areas. The coronavirus is increasingly causing the deaths of infants. The first documented Covid-related death of a baby happened in Orange County, Florida, as well as another infant died in Mississippi as a result of the drug. In late August, a kid under the age of one year was tragically killed in Merced County, California.

Scientists Are Looking Into COVID Affected Children’s Immune Systems

Doctor Paul Offit, an infectious disease specialist at Hospital for Children of Philadelphia, that like other pediatric clinics around the nation, has been swamped by Covid patients, said, “It’s very difficult to watch children suffer.”Nearly all children seemed to have been spared the harshest effects of Covid until the delta version lay siege to their homes last summer, for reasons that experts are still trying to figure out.

Scientists Are Looking Into COVID Affected Children's Immune Systems

Despite the fact that there is no proof that the delta variation causes more severe illness, the virus is so contagious that children are being admitted to hospitals in huge numbers, particularly in areas where vaccination rates are inadequate. It has been revealed that children were the source of almost 30% of Covid infections recorded for the week ending September 9, as per the American Academy of Family physicians.

The number of Covid infections in children under the age of 18 has increased by more than 243,000 instances in the same week, bringing the number of Covid infections in children under the age of 18 since the outbreak began to 5.3 million, with at least 534 fatalities.

According to the experts, it’s a simple matter of mathematics. Doctor Dimitri Christakis of the Seattle Children’s Research Center says that if ten times as many children are infected with Delta as with previous variants, “we will, of course, see ten times as many children hospitalized.” “If ten times as many children are infected with Delta as with previous variants, we will, of course, see ten times as many children hospitalized,” he says.

However, the most recent outbreak lends fresh urgency to a topic that has confounded experts throughout the pandemic: what is causing this outbreak? What is it that keeps the vast majority of youngsters from getting severely ill? And why does such protection sometimes fail to provide enough protection? According to Dr. Bill Kapogiannis, senior medical officer and a highly contagious specialist at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Children’s Hospital and Human Development, “this is an important and difficult issue.”

According to Kapogiannis, “we are putting out every effort to solve it, using all of the instruments at our disposal.” “I can’t wait for the answers to arrive.” Immune Systems are being investigated. During most of the epidemic, physicians could only speculate why children’s body systems were far more effective in fighting the coronavirus than adults. Despite the frightening increase in the number of youngsters admitted to hospitals during the current spike, young people are significantly less likely to become severely sick.