This research, which was just reported in Science Reports, examined the tooth cell harm induced by carbamide peroxide tooth brightening procedures. The study discovered that the suggested use of 10percent annual carbamide peroxide gels on teeth significantly lowers the dentin testosterone levels by up to 50 percent.
A survey published by experts at the University of Toronto demonstrates the extent to which popular tooth-whitening products could induce harm.

A Researcher Investigates The Toxicity Of Teeth-Whitening Products On Dental Cells


“We have always been interested in the effect of peroxide-based tooth whitening on the tooth structure and its link to sensitivity,” says Laurent Bozec, an associate professor in U of T’s Faculty of Dentistry who led the study. “Here, we wanted to further understand the impact on the enamel itself and deep inside the pulp.”
The investigation discovered that decreased dental proteins concentration led to increased lightening chemical absorption into the teeth, which could lead to an elevation in oral mucosal cell death. The tests were performed using an in-house alveolar bone infusion chamber. The scientists discovered that tooth pulp oocytes did not tolerate treatment to carbamide peroxide levels of roughly 35%.

A Researcher Investigates The Toxicity Of Teeth-Whitening Products On Dental Cells


To have desired shine on teeth people go for such products that contain chemicals like carbamide Peroxide which proves highly detrimental to the overall health of teeth even if they are white enough. Many known brands take benefit of the willingness of users to have such teeth and openly sell products that are not able to pass the medical tests also a member of the research team shared his views.
Before this investigation, Bozec was already researching the effects of peroxide in tooth canals therapy and discovered it was producing tissue degradation regionally. This prompted him to explore how peroxide penetrates the veneers and enamel and dentin before reaching the tooth enamel well as any collateral harm that may occur.
“Many home tooth-whitening products have such a high concentration of peroxide gel, for example, 35 percent, and yet, little is known about what it does to the inside of our teeth,” says Bozec. “We believe this is the first study of its kind to show the toxic effects of using a tooth-whitening agent. We hope that people will opt for a lower concentration of peroxide if they decide to use a tooth-whitening product as they are so much less harmful to your teeth.”
Whereas a lesser peroxide dosage, like 5%, will be less damaging to tooth cells, customers frequently opt for higher peroxide percentages to see instant gums results. The research demonstrates the importance of striking a balance among the peroxide levels utilized, the duration of treatment, the anticipated treatment results, and the adverse symptoms observed. 
The scientists urge that this be evaluated in vivo before commercial launch and that consumers are made informed of the effect of such treatments on their oral health.
“There is the potential to use either non-peroxide-based or a controlled peroxide release agent that will not cause the same damage,” says Bozec. “I believe that is the future of tooth-whitening.”
Bozec noted that the research, which featured Boris Hinz, a renowned lecturer at the Faculty of Dentistry, included an international partnership and the participation of undergraduates enrolled in the doctor of dental surgery program. Sabrina Nguyen and Ola Redha, a visiting Ph.D. student from University College, were among them.
“I worked with Professor Bozec previously at UCL for the last seven years and was fortunate to have him inviting me to work on and complete this project here at the Faculty of Dentistry,” says Redha.
“It’s been fascinating to research the highest level at both some universities.”